Wave-Particle Fluidity

Technical Papers

Wave-Particle Fluidity

Monday, 10 August 3:45 PM - 5:35 PM | Los Angeles Convention Center, Room 153A-C Session Chair: Changxi Zheng, Columbia University


Power Particles: An Incompressible Fluid Solver Based on Power Diagrams

This paper introduces a novel incompressible fluid solver based on time-evolving power diagrams that precisely control local fluid density and pressure forces, thus resulting in evenly spaced particle distributions and no significant numerical damping. The method is demonstrated in scenarios with free surfaces, moving obstacles, and two-phase flows.

Fernando de Goes
California Institute of Technology

Corentin Wallez
Ecole Polytechnique

Jin Huang
Zhejiang University

Dmitry Pavlov
Imperial College London

Mathieu Desbrun
California Institute of Technology

The Affine Particle-In-Cell Method

A novel yet very simple improvement to PIC that obtains most of the benefits of state-of-the-art FLIP solvers without their inherent instabilities. The technique computes and stores velocity derivatives on PIC particles so that particles are able to better represent the fluid flow.

Chenfanfu Jiang
University of California, Los Angeles

Craig Schroeder
University of California, Los Angeles

Andrew Selle
Walt Disney Animation Studios

Joseph Teran
Walt Disney Animation Studios, University of California, Los Angeles

Alexey Stomakhin
Walt Disney Animation Studios

Restoring the Missing Vorticity in Advection-Projection Fluid Solvers

This paper presents an IVOCK scheme to restore the lost vortices in typical advection-projection-based fluid solvers. IVOCK enhances fluid simulations efficiently with most major fluid solvers and produces natural turbulent animations for smoke and volumetric combustion.

Xinxin Zhang
The University of British Columbia

Robert Bridson
Autodesk, Inc.

Chen Greif
The University of British Columbia

A Stream Function Solver for Liquid Simulations

Presenting a liquid-simulation technique using a stream-function solver. Previous methods have used stream function for simulation of single-phase flows, but a formulation for liquid simulation has proved elusive. This paper introduces a stream-function approach to liquid simulations with novel boundary conditions.

Ryoichi Ando
Institute of Science and Technology Austria

Nils Thürey
Technische Universität München

Chris Wojtan
Institute of Science and Technology Austria

Water-Wave Animation via Wavefront Parameter Interpolation

This paper simulates water waves that reflect, refract, diffract, and disperse. The wavefront tracking algorithm sidesteps the Nyquist limit to produce extremely detailed waves at high frame rates.

Chris Wojtan
Institute of Science and Technology Austria

Stefan Jeschke
Institute of Science and Technology Austria